Instruction in Visual Art: Can It Help Children Learn to Read?

October 1st, 2000 | RESEARCH

Can reading skills be enhanced by instruction in the visual arts? Arts education researchers have sometimes made this claim and have argued that the visual arts can play a strong role in the teaching of basic skills in the kindergarten and elementary school years. There are two possible mechanisms by which visual arts instruction might enhance reading ability, one cognitive, one motivational. The cognitive mechanism would involve transfer of skill. Perhaps visual arts training strengthens visual perception skills that can be deployed in reading.

Document

(no document provided)

Team Members

Kristin Burger, Author
Ellen Winner, Author
University of Illinois, Publisher

Citation

Identifier Type: issn
Identifier: 0021-8510

Publication: Journal of Aesthetic Education
Volume: 34
Number: 3-4
Page(s): 277

Related URLs

http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/3333645?uid=3739832&uid=2129&uid=2&uid=70&uid=4&uid=3739256&sid=21103344943281

Tags

Audience: Educators | Teachers | Elementary School Children (6-10) | Museum | ISE Professionals | Pre-K Children (0-5)
Discipline: Art | music | theater | Education and learning science | Social science and psychology
Resource Type: Peer-reviewed article | Research Products
Environment Type: Informal | Formal Connections | K-12 Programs