Eyeballs in the Fridge: Sources of early interest in science

Date: 
Thursday, June 11, 2009
Resource Type:
Peer-reviewed article | Research Products
Environment Type: 
Informal/Formal Connections, K-12 Programs, Higher Education Programs
Audience: 
Undergraduate/Graduate Students | General Public | Museum/ISE Professionals | Scientists
Discipline: 
Education and learning science | General STEM
Access and Inclusion: 
Women and Girls
Organization:
University of Virginia Main Campus, Indiana University
Description or Abstract: 

This paper examines the experiences reported by scientists and graduate students regarding the experiences that first engaged them in science. The interviews analyzed for this paper come from Project Crossover, a mixed‐methods study of the transition from graduate student to PhD scientist in the fields of chemistry and physics. This analysis involved review of 116 interviews collected from graduate students and scientists and focused on the timing, source, and nature of their earliest interest in science. The majority (65%) of participants reported that their interest in science began before middle school. Females were more likely to report that their interest was sparked by school‐related activities, while most males recounted self‐initiated activities. Our findings indicate that current policy efforts (which focus on high school science reform) to increase the numbers of students studying in the science fields, may be misguided.

Citation
DOI:
10.1080/09500690902792385
Publication Name: 
International Journal of Science Education
Volume: 
32
Number: 
5
Page Number: 
669
Document:

Team Members

Robert TaiRobert TaiAuthor
Adam MalteseAdam MalteseAuthor

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